Joe Costantino | Weymouth Real Estate, Abington Real Estate, Rockland Real Estate


There are basically three types of clutter that tend to emerge in most homes, and it usually gets worse as time goes on.

Homeowners often get so used to their own clutter, that it becomes virtually invisible to them.

That's one of the reasons it can be extremely helpful to work with a real estate agent when preparing your home for sale. Not only can an experienced agent provide an objective point of view, but most agents have a trained eye that can spot unsightly clutter "a mile away"!

There are several reasons household clutter is an issue when trying to stage a home for sale. First of all, it's an eyesore. It makes your home look less inviting to prospect buyers, and, in many cases, in makes rooms look smaller. Clutter also makes it more difficult to keep surfaces and floors clean, which is one of the cardinal rules of effectively staging a home.

Three Types of Clutter to Target

There's a delicate balance between having just enough --or too many -- items on countertops and tables. In most cases, it's too much! You're usually better off "erring on the side of sparseness," rather than the other way around. Unless something serves either a decorative or functional purpose (preferably both), it probably should be stored away in a drawer or cabinet. If it weren't for the fact that buyers typically look in closets when touring a home, then that would be an obvious place to hide clutter. However, that's sure to make a bad impression.

When you think of the word "clutter," what's the first thing that comes to mind? A typical mental image is that of a room crowded with too much furniture. That's a common problem with improperly staged homes, and it's a surefire way to send prospective buyers scurrying -- ones who might have otherwise made an offer. Cluttered rooms look smaller, messy, disorganized, and -- in some cases -- chaotic. None of those characteristics are going to create a good feeling in people's minds, which is a primary objective when showing a home to potential buyers.

The third type of clutter, which is also pretty typical, is wall clutter -- specifically: too many paintings, photos, art prints, posters, wall clocks, and other miscellaneous objects which make the walls look "too busy"! For some home sellers, this can be the most difficult aspect of visual clutter to fix because there's an emotional connection to family photographs, children's drawings, and so on.

If you're torn between what to display and what to hide, your real estate agent can be the best source of objective, unbiased advice. In many cases, "less is more," but it pays to get a professional opinion!


The good news: a homebuyer has made an offer on your house and is ready to purchase it as quickly as possible. On the other hand, there's the bad news: this homebuyer has many requests that need to be fulfilled to finalize a home sale.

Unfortunately, a stubborn homebuyer can put a home sale in jeopardy. But a home seller who understands how to deal with a stubborn homebuyer effectively may be able to boost his or her chances of a seamless property sale.

Now, let's take a look at three steps that every home seller can use to deal with a stubborn homebuyer:

1. Focus on the End Results

For most home sellers, the end goal of selling a home is getting the best price for your residence, regardless of the current real estate market's conditions. As such, if you remain focused on your ultimate goals, you may be better equipped than others to deal with a stubborn homebuyer.

If a stubborn homebuyer submits a variety of requests, allocate the necessary time and resources to consider each request closely. Then, if you find the requests are overwhelming, you can always submit counter-proposals.

Lastly, don't forget that you can always walk away from a home selling negotiation that appears to be going nowhere. And remember, if a negotiation with a stubborn homebuyer goes south, you can relist your residence and restart the home selling journey.

2. Consider the Homebuyer's Perspective

Why is a homebuyer acting stubborn? Open the lines of communication with a homebuyer, and you may be able to find out the root of a property buyer's stubbornness and proceed accordingly.

A homebuyer may have concerns or questions about buying your residence. Fortunately, if you maintain open lines of communication with a homebuyer, you can address these concerns and questions without delay.

Also, be aware of the homebuyer's perspective as you proceed along a property selling negotiation. Although a homebuyer may make requests along the way, it is important for you and a property buyer to find common ground. If you feel uncomfortable with a homebuyer's requests, you should be unafraid to walk away from a home selling negotiation altogether.

3. Ask a Real Estate Agent for Extra Help

If you're unsure about how to approach a stubborn homebuyer, there is no need to worry. Conversely, meet with an expert real estate agent, and you can find out how to move one step closer to getting the best price for your residence.

An expert real estate agent will be happy to provide honest, unbiased recommendations about how to collaborate with a stubborn property buyer. Next, you and a stubborn homebuyer can work together to complete a home sale.

Plus, an expert real estate agent may act as a liaison between a property seller and buyer. This housing market professional can learn about both sides and what they are looking for in a home sale and take the necessary steps to deliver the ideal results for all parties involved.

Take the guesswork out of dealing with a stubborn homebuyer – use these tips, and you can boost your chances of navigating a successful home selling journey.


If you’re hunting for a new home and have come across one that fits all of your requirements and more, it can seem like the only thing you can do is make an offer and wait.

However, your first choice could also be another buyer’s dream home. And, if a higher bid isn’t feasible, you have to find other ways to win over the seller. One way this can be achieved is through writing a letter to the owner of the home.

If you’re bidding on your dream home, writing a letter the the owner can be anxiety inducing. Choosing what to reveal and finding the right words can be scary, even for the most seasoned writer.

So, in this article we’re going to walk you through writing a letter to a seller to give you the best possible chance of winning the bid for a new home.

Tell them why you love their home

If you’ve fallen in love with certain aspects of the home, there’s a good chance the sellers did too. Be personal in your explanations. Rather than just say you love the location, mention that it is a perfect distance to walk to the playground with your children or pets. This will help buyers better understand you and your story.

If you have family who lives nearby, or if the home has features that can greatly improve the life of you, your family, or your pets, be sure to mention this in the letter as well.

Don’t press or plead, just be polite

It can seem desperate and off-putting to receive a letter pleading with you to sell your home to someone. So, when you’re writing your letter and you come to the end, simply thank the buyer for their time and for reading, compliment them once more, and wish them luck in their new home.

Revise and review

It can be tempting to send your letter immediately after writing it, especially if writing is you don’t like writing in general. However, it’s always a good idea to revise. I suggest writing your letter one night, then reading it again the next evening to give yourself time and distance from it--this way you’ll be reading it with fresh eyes and will be able to find any wording that sounds strange or confusing.

It’s also a good idea to run your writing through a free proofreader like Grammarly. And, finally, there is no substitute for having an editor. Ask one of your friends or family members to read the letter and give you feedback.

Stand out from the crowd

There are a few things you can include in your letter to set you apart from other potential buyers. Including a family photo will help the sellers put a face to the names you mention in the letter.

It can also be helpful to print and mail the letter, rather than sending it electronically. Since we so rarely receive a physical copy of a letter these days (unless it’s from a bill collector), it can be nice to receive something positive in the mail for a change.


This Condo in Weymouth, MA recently sold for $327,500. This Townhouse style home was sold by Joe Costantino - Costantino Realty Group.


67 Old Quarry Dr, Weymouth, MA 02188

Condo

$329,500
Price
$327,500
Sale Price

6
Rooms
2
Beds
2/2
Full/Half Baths
Beautiful and private three-level townhouse with a spacious and open floor plan. 1st floor features a dramatic 2-story foyer and skylight. Gleaming Harwood floors in foyer and in eat-in kitchen with conveniently located laundry room, closet and half bath. Cathedral ceilings in living and dining rooms with recessed lighting above wood burning fireplace in living room. Sliding doors open out to a private deck surrounded by abutting conservation land. 2nd floor has two bedrooms with private full bathrooms. Double entry doors into the king size master suite with two closets for ample storage and a pull down staircase for additional attic storage. Finished basement with half bath and small office room leading out to a covered brick patio.

Similar Properties



If your house is on the market or you're preparing to put it up for sale, you probably feel like you have 101 things to do!

Fortunately, the list is much smaller than that and you can enlist the help of a real estate agent to handle many of the details.

To increase your chances for a fast sale, your agent will offer you suggestions on ways to enhance the eye appeal and curb appeal of your home. Although many of the things they point out may seem minor and superficial, the cumulative effect they'll have on the marketability of your home could be significant.

Minor flaws will be noticed by potential buyers and could easily give them the impression that your home hasn't been updated, properly maintained, and well taken care of. While that may not be true, remember that presentation is everything. And, if I may slip in one more old, but true cliché: "You don't get a second chance to make a good first impression!" That is as true in real estate sales as it is in making sure you're breath is fresh!

With that in mind, here's a list of some of the relatively inexpensive improvements you can make that will help you favorably impress prospective home buyers.

  • There are a lot of cheap or relatively inexpensive repairs you can make, such as repairing and painting over damaged walls, oiling squeaky hinges, and replacing cracked windows and bathroom tiles. Toilets that run and faucets that leak are other examples of minor problems that can make a bad impression on potential buyers.
  • Lighting, both natural and artificial, sets the mood in a room and can have an impact on how people perceive your home. It's usually advisable to let in as much natural light as possible and increase the wattage of lightbulbs in dark rooms and hallways. On the other hand, harsh lightening can also make an unfavorable impression, so it's necessary to find the perfect balance between glaring and dreary lighting. Most real estate agents are attuned to minor (or major) changes that need to be made to elements like lighting, décor, and furniture arrangement.
  • Avoid the appearance of clutter, disorganization, and chaos in any part of your home! This would apply to everything from closets and cabinets to counter-tops, desks, and bedroom dressers. If your basement or attic is a "disaster area," that could reflect negatively on you and the attractiveness of your home. A good, general rule-of-thumb for controlling clutter is "less is more."
  • Be prepared to do at least a little painting and a lot of cleaning to prepare your house for successful showings. A certain amount of landscaping and lawn care is also necessary, with tasks such as mowing, pruning, and weeding at the top of the list.
Although there are a lot of things to keep in mind when staging and preparing your home for a fast sale, the best way to start out is with a list of priorities and the advice of a seasoned real estate agent.



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