Joe Costantino | Weymouth Real Estate, Abington Real Estate, Rockland Real Estate


Contingencies on a contract to buy a home are there to protect both the buyer and the seller. The contingencies give the buyer the right to back out of the contract if any of these contingencies aren’t met. There are many reasons that buyers back out of deals including financial issues and problems with the home. Below, you’ll find a break down of some of the most common contingencies and what they mean for you as a buyer or a seller.   


Financing Contingency


Most home contracts come with what’s called a financing contingency. This gives you the ability to walk away from a deal if the financing falls through when trying to buy a home. Usually this is due to a credit reason or some other financial reason. You can’t rely on financial cracks to help you to back out of a deal on a home. Lenders will only deny a loan for real financial reasons. There’s no way to ask a lender to lie for you so you can get out of buying a home! This is why you need to make your decision about a home purchase wisely.   



Inspection Contingency


This gives the buyer the right to have an inspection on the home within a certain time frame which is usually 5-7 days. If something is really off with the inspection that you as a buyer don’t feel comfortable with, you have the right to back out of a deal without repercussions. While seller disclosures are important, the seller can’t disclose what they don’t know about. That’s why the home inspection is so important. The seller’s disclosure cannot protect you from hidden damages that may cost half of a home’s worth to repair.   


Appraisal Contingency


If homes are selling fast and you want some secure way to back out of a deal you should consider an appraisal contingency. If the home you want to purchase doesn’t appraise at a price high enough to meet your mortgage requirements, you have a legal way to back out of the deal. For example, if you put down 20 percent of the purchase price of a home and the home doesn't appraise for the value of that purchase price, you’d need to come up with the remainder of the money in cash. An appraisal contingency protects you from having to face this. You’ll still need to have a home inspection done on the home to search for any problems, but an appraisal contingency protects you from any problems with financing and your own disposable amount of cash that could arise due to a home appraising low. 


While contingencies aren’t necessary as a homebuyer, they’re highly recommended. Without contingencies, you could be left with a number of expenses such as damages that are extremely costly to fix.


An open house represents a valuable opportunity for a home seller. If a seller plans ahead for an open house, he or she may boost the likelihood of hosting an unforgettable event that showcases the full beauty of a residence. As a result, this seller may receive multiple offers on his or her home as soon as the open house reaches its conclusion.

Believe it or not, preparing for an open house can be easy. Now, let's take a look at three tips to help a home seller get ready for an open house.

1. Perform Extensive Cleaning

A neat, tidy home is ideal, particularly for a home seller who wants to enjoy a fast, profitable home selling experience. Thus, if you allocate the necessary time and resources to clean your residence now, you may be better equipped than ever before to host a successful open house.

To clean your home's interior, you'll want to take a room-by-room approach. Wipe down each room's walls, mop or vacuum the floors and remove any debris.

Moreover, you should spend some time mowing the front lawn, trimming the hedges and performing assorted home exterior maintenance. And if you need extra help along the way, don't hesitate to reach out to a professional landscaping company, either.

2. Declutter As Much As Possible

Clutter can make it tough for a homebuyer to envision what life may be like if he or she buys your residence. Therefore, you'll want to remove as much clutter as possible prior to an open house.

Oftentimes, it helps to rent a storage unit where you can store assorted clutter until you finalize a home sale. A storage unit generally provides a safe and affordable option for home sellers who want to safeguard various belongings over the course of several weeks or months.

On the other hand, it may be beneficial to sell excess items online or host a yard sale. Because if you can sell items that you no longer need, you can declutter your home and earn extra cash at the same time.

3. Collaborate with a Real Estate Agent

Hosting an open house may prove to be challenging, particularly for those who are trying to work alone. Fortunately, real estate agents are available who can help you take the guesswork out of getting ready for any open house, at any time.

A real estate agent is happy to provide comprehensive support at each stage of the home selling journey. As such, he or she will help you enhance your home and ensure it is open house-ready.

Usually, a real estate agent will offer personalized recommendations to help you prep your residence for an open house. This housing market professional also will promote your open house in the weeks and days leading up to the event. And when the open house ends, a real estate agent can provide honest, unbiased event feedback as well.

Host a successful open house – use the aforementioned tips, and you should have no trouble achieving the best-possible results during an open house.


The good news: a homebuyer has made an offer on your house and is ready to purchase it as quickly as possible. On the other hand, there's the bad news: this homebuyer has many requests that need to be fulfilled to finalize a home sale.

Unfortunately, a stubborn homebuyer can put a home sale in jeopardy. But a home seller who understands how to deal with a stubborn homebuyer effectively may be able to boost his or her chances of a seamless property sale.

Now, let's take a look at three steps that every home seller can use to deal with a stubborn homebuyer:

1. Focus on the End Results

For most home sellers, the end goal of selling a home is getting the best price for your residence, regardless of the current real estate market's conditions. As such, if you remain focused on your ultimate goals, you may be better equipped than others to deal with a stubborn homebuyer.

If a stubborn homebuyer submits a variety of requests, allocate the necessary time and resources to consider each request closely. Then, if you find the requests are overwhelming, you can always submit counter-proposals.

Lastly, don't forget that you can always walk away from a home selling negotiation that appears to be going nowhere. And remember, if a negotiation with a stubborn homebuyer goes south, you can relist your residence and restart the home selling journey.

2. Consider the Homebuyer's Perspective

Why is a homebuyer acting stubborn? Open the lines of communication with a homebuyer, and you may be able to find out the root of a property buyer's stubbornness and proceed accordingly.

A homebuyer may have concerns or questions about buying your residence. Fortunately, if you maintain open lines of communication with a homebuyer, you can address these concerns and questions without delay.

Also, be aware of the homebuyer's perspective as you proceed along a property selling negotiation. Although a homebuyer may make requests along the way, it is important for you and a property buyer to find common ground. If you feel uncomfortable with a homebuyer's requests, you should be unafraid to walk away from a home selling negotiation altogether.

3. Ask a Real Estate Agent for Extra Help

If you're unsure about how to approach a stubborn homebuyer, there is no need to worry. Conversely, meet with an expert real estate agent, and you can find out how to move one step closer to getting the best price for your residence.

An expert real estate agent will be happy to provide honest, unbiased recommendations about how to collaborate with a stubborn property buyer. Next, you and a stubborn homebuyer can work together to complete a home sale.

Plus, an expert real estate agent may act as a liaison between a property seller and buyer. This housing market professional can learn about both sides and what they are looking for in a home sale and take the necessary steps to deliver the ideal results for all parties involved.

Take the guesswork out of dealing with a stubborn homebuyer – use these tips, and you can boost your chances of navigating a successful home selling journey.


After you add your house to the real estate market, it may be only a matter of days before you receive the first offer on your residence.

Ultimately, the initial offer on your home may prove to be the best proposal for a number of reasons, including:

1. The offer matches or exceeds your expectations.

An informed home seller understands the condition of his or her house, and as such, sets realistic expectations for the home selling journey.

For a home seller, it is paramount to conduct a home appraisal before you list your residence. With this appraisal, you can learn about your residence's strengths and weaknesses and price your house accordingly.

Furthermore, a home appraisal will help you understand the true value of your home. And if you receive an initial offer that matches or surpasses your expectations, you should have no trouble accepting the proposal and moving forward with a home sale.

2. The offer corresponds to the current state of the real estate market.

Operating in a buyer's market is far different from operating in a seller's market, and perhaps it is easy to understand why.

In a buyer's market, there is an abundance of high-quality houses and a shortage of property buyers. This means a buyer's market typically favors property buyers over property sellers.

On the other hand, a seller's market usually favors property sellers. This market includes many property buyers and a shortage of top-notch houses. Thus, the likelihood of receiving a terrific first offer may increase in a seller's market and decrease in a buyer's market.

As a home seller, it is essential to allocate the necessary time and resources to learn about the housing market. If you understand the differences between a buyer's market and a seller's market, you can identify a great initial offer on your house.

3. The offer is a must-accept in the eyes of your real estate agent.

When it comes to selling a house, it often is a wonderful idea to work with a real estate agent. In fact, this housing market professional may prove to be a difference-maker at each stage of the home selling journey.

A real estate agent will help you list your residence, promote it to potential homebuyers and set up home showings and open houses. That way, he or she can make it easy for you to generate substantial interest in your residence as soon as it becomes available.

Perhaps most important, a real estate agent is happy to provide honest, unbiased home selling recommendations. This housing market professional will help you differentiate between a mediocre initial offer and a stellar one and ensure you can make informed home selling decisions.

Lastly, be sure to analyze the initial offer on your home closely before you accept it. By taking a diligent approach to this home proposal, you can evaluate the pros and cons of it and make the best possible decision based on your individual needs.




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